How to Measure Anything in Public Policy and Social Impact – November 7, 2019

$150.00

What is the best way to measure the impact of social and public programs that are notoriously difficult to measure? This three-hour webinar will explain how to measure–and forecast–social impact with justified confidence. Thursday, November 7th, 2019 12:00pm – 3:00pm CT (UTC-5)

Can’t make this session? 

Here are two options:

  1. Sign up for the next session: The next session will be scheduled for Q12020. Email us so we can send you that date as soon as it is available.
  2. Sign up for this session and receive a recording: All registrants also receive a recording of the presentation, even if they could not attend.
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Description

For decades, social sector leaders have wanted to know exactly how much good their policies and strategies are accomplishing. But social impact – the benefit policies and philanthropic efforts give to their beneficiaries –  can be notoriously difficult to quantify.

The good news: social impact measurement is easier than commonly believed — all it takes is a better understanding of what measurement is and what it can do for us. Based on the principles espoused in Doug Hubbard’s book How to Measure Anything: Finding the Value of Intangibles in Business and practiced by Hubbard Decision Research (HDR), this three-hour webinar covers how to measure–and forecast–social impact with justified confidence. Better measurements can help build models to simulate and forecast policy or program performance; demonstrate the value of an initiative to board members, elected officials, or the public; support budget and fundraising decisions; and improve the overall effectiveness of any initiative – even before the initiative ever begins.

In this webinar, participants will learn:

  • How the most important decision leaders will make is how to make measurably better decisions
  • How a failure to invest in measurement can lead to bad social sector decisions with often-adverse and harmful outcomes
  • The three reasons why anything ever appears to be “immeasurable” – and how these reasons are all myths
  • How anything, even “intangibles,” can be properly measured
  • Simple ways to find out what information is valuable and worth measuring – and what isn’t
  • How to improve planning and resource allocation with probabilistic thinking
  • What next steps they can take to incorporate more advanced concepts and improve their analysis

Participants will also learn how HDR used these principles to create a model to determine the impact of an ecological restoration project conducted by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) and make key recommendations toward the program’s success.

After this training, webinar attendees will have practical tools to immediately begin measuring social impact for better policy outcomes – and a better society.

Deliverables

Each participant will receive:

  1. A recording of the presentation
  2. The slide deck used in the presentation

Schedule a Private Webinar for Your Organization

We offer private webinar sessions for an organization with special discounted group rates. Contact us for more information and to schedule your next training session.

Additional information

HTMA in Public Policy and Social Impact Dates

Thursday, November 7th, 2019 1:00pm – 3:00pm CT (UTC-5)

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